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Although Hippies and mainstream Rock listeners made up only a very small percentage of the “teen-oriented” record-buying public in the late 1960s, as Bubblegum made its way more and more into the Billboard Top 100, it was virtually impossible to follow mainstream Rock radio without encountering these silly little ditties sandwiched in-between soon-to-be-Rock legends like Strawberry Alarm Clock's “Incense and Peppermints” and early Who's “I Can See For Miles."
Published by James R. Coffey 71 months ago in Music | +11 votes | 10 comments
By early 1963, female singers became a mainstay of the Pop/Rock Billboard Top 100 including Dusty Springfield (who by 1966 was the best-selling female artist in the world) with her up-tempo hit “I Only Want to Be With You,” Skeeter Davis with the melancholy “The End of the World,” Little Peggy March’s “I Will Follow Him,” and the #1 hit from Lesley Gore, “It’s My Party.” In 1964, Brit Petula Clark and Canadian Buffy Sainte-Marie began making names for the...
Published by James R. Coffey 71 months ago in Music | +11 votes | 7 comments
Often distinguished from the other Soul “Sounds” by its stylish, funky, “uptown” soul characteristics--described as “not as hard-edged as Southern soul”--The Memphis Sound could easily be recognized by its lavish rhythm section--a unison of horns, organ, and bass--all driven by an almost primal drum beat. During this uniquely diverse and musically-innovative decade, the Memphis Sound would ultimately come to be defined by the artists who represented it, including Johnny ...
Published by James R. Coffey 72 months ago in Music | +7 votes | 3 comments
During the "Summer of Love,” Psychedelic Rock music entered the mainstream--both through the airwaves and via print media--subsequently receiving more and more commercial radio airplay across the country. The Bohemian atmosphere seemed to inspire the music which in turn further inspired the Bohemian atmosphere. In May of ‘67, the song "San Francisco (Be Sure to Wear Flowers in Your Hair)" was released, giving an indication of where the Summer was headed. But nothing and no one could ...
Published by James R. Coffey 72 months ago in Music | +9 votes | 11 comments
The Beatles can be considered as the epitome of being popular; in fact they have performed some of their songs in different languages, and have used other languages other than English into their songs. The Beatles could make out a tune from any language and turn it into a popular song.
Published by Gerard 72 months ago in Music | +7 votes | 6 comments
Bands like Cream, The Jimi Hendrix Experience (“Purple Haze”), Pink Floyd, Blue Cheer (who had a variety of LSD named after them), The Doors, Iron Butterfly, Big Brother & The Holding Company, The Velvet Underground, Jefferson Airplane, New Riders of the Purple Sage, Blue Cheer, Quicksilver Messenger Service, Stone Garden, and the Grateful Dead all became known as the “acid” bands. And although--technically-speaking--Big Brother was more of a Blues band and the New Riders and Gr...
Published by James R. Coffey 72 months ago in Music | +6 votes | 4 comments
Discovering and signing a veritable whoÂ’s who of Black recording greats--from Mary Wells to Gladys Knight to The Jackson Five--Gordy parlayed a knack for knowing a hit song when he heard one, into one of the biggest music empires in the world. And although all but a few of his line-up were Black artists, Motown RecordÂ’s influence on the Rock music industry via its songwriters, musicians, and performers was nothing short of extraordinary. From 1970 to present day, Motown Records has gon...
Published by James R. Coffey 72 months ago in Music | +8 votes | 10 comments
By definition, “transposition” is the functional, theory-based method of moving chords and/or notes from one “key” to another. Although many music purists like to equate this endeavor with some mystical and magical art likened to alchemy, it is, in reality a simple process involving simple mathematics. Here we will demonstrate and explain how to transpose chords.
Published by James R. Coffey 72 months ago in Music | +7 votes | 2 comments
During the mid- to late-1950s, the so-called “Bakersfield Sound,” centralized in the San Joaquin Valley south of Los Angeles, had established itself as the anti-Nashville center for Country music, producing all the early work of Buck Owens (“Love’s Gonna Live Here”) and Merle Haggard (“Sing a Sad Song”) [much more recently, Dwight Yoakam], and “Surf-Rock” had evolved from several spots around Orange County, producing the Chantays (“Pipeline”), the Beac...
Published by James R. Coffey 72 months ago in Music | +10 votes | 12 comments
In 1965, Bill Medley and Bobby Hatfield--known as the Righteous Brothers--released a song that astonished radio listeners with just how “Soulful” two White guys could actually sound, “YouÂ’ve Lost That LovinÂ’ FeelinÂ’,” from their aptly-named album, Some Blue-Eyed Soul. Many first-time listeners naturally assumed the duo was Black. Later in ‘65 four guys from New Jersey calling themselves The Young Rascals released “I AinÂ’t Gonna Eat Out My Heart AnymoreÂ...
Published by James R. Coffey 72 months ago in Music | +9 votes | 4 comments
Leading the so-called "British Invasion" was the dark and gritty British band called The Animals. Fronted by the moody and often dismal Eric Burdon, they hit the American airwaves with the now-classic "The House of the Rising Sun," followed by "We Gotta Get Out of This Place,” "It's My Life,” and "Don't Let Me Be Misunderstood.” Right behind them came Manfred Mann with "Do Wah Diddy Diddy,” Freddie and the Dreamers with “I’m Telling You Now,” Wayne Fontana and the M...
Published by James R. Coffey 72 months ago in Music | +5 votes | 3 comments
While several “girl” groups came to prominence during the early 1960s including The Shangri-Las (“Leader of the Pack”), The Crystals (“Da Doo Ron Ron”), and the Ronettes (“Be My Baby”), Joan Baez's popularity had succeeded in opening the door for a long succession of female solo artists, all of whom would come to play significant roles in the progression of Rock music.
Published by James R. Coffey 72 months ago in Music | +7 votes | 7 comments
Musicnotes.com is the leading retailer of licensed digital sheet music online.  The site contains more than 60,000 digital titles and over 260,000 mail-order titles of music sheets for all kinds of instruments and music genres.   Users can search their music sheets in several ways.  A search field is available where they can type the Title, Artist, Instrument, Show, composer, voices, or simply browse through various categories of music sheets that are organized in the complet...
Published by Athena Goodlight 72 months ago in Music | +13 votes | 5 comments
As of 2009, the Beatles have won an Academy Award, 7 Grammy Awards, had 24 multi-platinum albums, 39 platinum albums, 45 gold albums, a one silver. Inducted in the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 1988, they are ranked #1, hold the record for most #1 hits on the Billboard Hot 100 chart (with 20), and have certifiably sold more albums in the US than any other artist. Collectively (John, Paul, George, and Ringo) were included in Time magazine's compilation of the 20th century's 100 most influential ...
Published by James R. Coffey 72 months ago in Music | +19 votes | 22 comments
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