The Beatles in Many Languages
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The Beatles in Many Languages

The Beatles can be considered as the epitome of being popular; in fact they have performed some of their songs in different languages, and have used other languages other than English into their songs. The Beatles could make out a tune from any language and turn it into a popular song.

The Beatles are the epitome of being popular; in fact they have performed some of their songs in different languages, and have used other languages other than English into their songs. The Beatles could make out a tune from any language and turn it into a popular song.

Komm, Gib Mir Deine Hand

The original language of the song is “I Want to Hold Your Hand”, the tracks used by the Beatles were the same as the single except for the vocal track. Brian Epstein was convinced by a recording company that The Beatles needed to record a German version of the song so that the Germans would buy them. Translation of songs where rampant during the Beatles time, but this was the first time the Beatles did so.

Sie Liebt Dich

The same scenario except that The Beatles had to record an all new track. The resulting single was released as a Double A in Germany.

Michelle

 Michelle is one of the most popular Beatles tune, it is found in the Rubber Soul Album. This is one of Paul McCartney’s early songs, a song he wrote with a Zenith Guitar. Michelle and Ma belle (which means my beauty in French) go together well, so Paul McCartney asked what the phrase “These are words that go together well” translation to French is, therefore resulting to: “Sont les mots qui vont très bien ensemble.”

Sun King

 Sun King is the first song of the first medley of The Beatles album: Abbey Road. When the track is about to segue to the next song of the album (medley) The Beatles added Spanish, Italian, Portuguese and English nonsense they learnt. The Beatles also used to call themselves Los Para Noias

Los Paranoias

 A phrase made up of nonsense words Paul McCartney learnt from school, the song was written by Paul McCartney for Cillia Black. The Beatles recorded the song while doing the White Album

Besame Mucho

This track was previously mentioned in my article about Paul McCartney’s cheesy songs. Besame Mucho means kiss me a lot in Spanish

Bonus: Yellow Submarine

 Jeremy Hilary Boob Ph.D uttered the words “Ad hoc, ad loc, and quid pro quo!” in the Yellow Submarine Movie, he thought the words meant  So little time — so much to know! But the phrase is virtually non-existent in Latin.

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Comments (6)

Interesting and enjoyable write-up. Thanks

Personally, their Rubber Soul album was their best.

A nice article on popular Beatles. Thank you Gerard. Voted.

Ranked #1 in Music

“Ad hoc, ad loc, and quid pro quo!”: "According to this, according to a literary work, and in consideration of (something received in return for something given)!"

Ranked #2 in Music

I am quite convinced that “Ad hoc, ad loc, and quid pro quo!”: doesn't mean anything in Latin. The French would also notice that the French lyrics in Michelle is grammatically incorrect, "les" should be "des"

This is an enjoyable article. I am following you and buzzed this up.

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