The Beatles: Variations on Songs
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The Beatles: Variations on Songs

The Beatles have done a lot of experiments while recording songs, some of these included adding Studio Effects and Studio Gimmicks which later resulted to contributions to Pop Music as a whole. Because of these experiments, The Beatles had a hard time whether which take will be considered the best, this resulted too many variations on the songs by The Beatles.

The Beatles have done a lot of experiments while recording songs, some of these included adding Studio Effects and Studio Gimmicks which later resulted to contributions to Pop Music as a whole. Because of these experiments, The Beatles had a hard time whether which take will be considered the best, this resulted too many variations on the songs by The Beatles.

Demos and experimental takes of the Beatles will not be considered because these songs are evolving as a whole.

She’s Leaving Home

 

The variation on the song is not easily noticeable the chord progression is still the same; however the mono mix differs from the stereo mix. All mono mixes generally differ from the stereo mixes of the Beatles, in the manner on which you hear them but the Mono recording of She’s Leaving Home is the original mix while the recording of She’s Leaving Home in Mono is slower and thus in a lower pitch (one semi tone to be exact). This was done to make Paul McCartney’s voice sound younger. 

Helter Skelter

Beatle Fans have been wanting to get the 24 minute long track of Helter Skelter, this take is actually the original take of the track, the take released was just a shortened version of the original recording. The Mono track is shorter than the Stereo track; the stereo track has a fade out and Ringo Starr screaming “I’ve Got Blisters on my Fingers”. Ringo Starr was complaining for playing the drums in a “dirty” style.

I’m Looking Through You

 

The Beatles recorded an earlier take of the song; it was slower and bluesy than the track released in the Rubber Soul Album. The percussion of the song included Ringo Starr doing “claps” but the sound effect was actually achieved by tapping a matchbox. (Ringo Starr later recorded a song entitled Matchbox). The catchy rhythm track was amazingly recorded in a single take. The first take lacks the “Why, tell me why'” section. This version of I’m Looking Through You was first released in Anthology 2. It is very hard to choose the better version of the two. The first take is more acoustic and accompanied perfectly by the guitar while the second take is more appreciated by pop listeners because of its fast pace. Both takes end with a Fade-Out song (Paul McCartney apparently shouting and singing) albeit in different lyrics.

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Comments (1)

Thank you Gerard for this interesting post. Voted.

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